Sloshing coffee stirs memories – La Vernia News


Sometimes memories pop out over the simplest things. We all have these happen whether they’re good memories or not-so-good memories.
It might be a glass sloshing its contents onto a surface, and you hear, “Don’t cry over spilt milk.” Sadly, for some of us, we recall childhood memories of hearing adults losing their ever-loving minds at us over the same event.
How about those summer times, hearing the ice cream man’s music? Notice the adults near you when they hear that same music today. Our reaction has never aged! (When I had my Harley, I played some classic rock music at 140 watts. Y’all have heard “Loud pipes save lives.” Well, I knew loud pipes annoy people, but something about “Bad to the Bone”-type music seemed to be less annoying then, and people seemed to know I was coming their way.)
This morning, my own coffee “cup runneth over,” requiring a saucer. Immediately, my mind saw another time and place. It’s the late 1950s, and Grandpa and I are sitting at the table. Grandma places a lime-green bowl in front of me and pours in Kellogg’s Corn Flakes (from the box with the big rooster on the front) and whole milk. She sets a lime-green cup and saucer in front of Grandpa and fills the cup with steaming-hot coffee. He pours thick cream into it and stirs it slowly. Then he purposely pours some of the coffee onto the saucer. He blows across the saucer as he sips this coffee. Once the saucer is empty, he again pours his coffee onto the saucer, repeating his coffee drinking style. My childhood mind is taken aback with his “odd” drinking ritual. Never have I forgotten this whole scene.
Decades later, I learn that Grandpa was displaying European etiquette. It was I who lacked understanding of a totally acceptable social etiquette. (See www.google.com/amp/s/blog.lacolombe.com/2015/07/16/saucers-bet-you-didn’t-know/amp/.)
How often do we jump to conclusions and reactions with what we see? Our reactions lead to “home rage,” “work rage,” and “road rage.” I can hear that Scripture that says, “That one who controls their temper [reactions] is mightier than the one conquering a whole city.” (Proverbs 16:32)
“Lord, conquer my temper and reactions, for without Your holy help, I slosh too much!”
Warning: These musings may be serious or may be humorous. Enjoy! H.R. Grimm is a self-described lovable, prone to blunt, witty, tending toward sarcastic, saved-by-grace, constantly thinking storyteller. Grimm, a military veteran, and his wife now call La Vernia home. Email [email protected].
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